Interview

Amber Simone

RISING FAST THROUGH THE BRITISH MUSIC SCENE, AMBER SIMONE IS A MUSICIAN THAT WILL KEEP YOU ON YOUR FEET. INSPIRED BY THE SOUL AND FUNKY HOUSE OF HER CHILDHOOD, THE ARTIST NOW CRAFTS MUSIC THAT IS UPBEAT, INFECTIOUS AND JOYFUL - PERFECT FOR SUMMER LISTENING. HER DEBUT EP ‘FOR THOSE MOMENTS’ HAS CLOCKED UP HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF LISTENS AND WON HER FANS AROUND THE GLOBE

What is your earliest memory of falling in love with music?

I think there have definitely been different stages and many points where my love for music has grown and become more significant. I first discovered music in a way that I believe most people do, by hearing it in the house and in my parents’ cars - just observing the way it made people feel and move. Still to this day, those memories and songs will forever take me back to those moments and that in itself speaks volumes of its power.

The moment things really changed for me though was when I started going to see live music as a teenager and being able to connect with and exchange that energy coming from the stage. I think one of the first shows I ever saw was an NME annual tour with Metronomy on the bill - I think after that was when I decided I really wanted to be on stage and do something that energised people to feel the same way that I felt.

Your sound has distinct hints of Soul and Disco, were you influenced by these genres growing up? Who did you listen to in your household?

Soul and funky house were more of a component at home when I was growing up than disco, but generally feel-good, uplifting music was a big part of growing up for me. My parents were big fans of hosting people over at our house when I was small and every summer my mum loved throwing parties and carnival-like day BBQs as we got older. I think that introduction to dance music created more of a gateway for me to discover disco more independently, but I would say for sure that those genres have played a big role and influenced me a lot up until now.

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You're working on a new record, what message do you want to get across with your music?

I’m currently working on my second EP and already feel as though I have a much greater focus in terms of what I want to say and the content I want to create. My first EP was the greatest lesson I could have given myself and thankfully it has given me a wider perspective on what I want and at the same time don’t want.

With this second project, I feel that my headspace definitely occupies a more self-aware perspective and therefore I’m trying to create more challenges for myself, in the writing process, by channeling my experience of life in areas other than love. I really want to create something that feels richer for the soul and I suppose something that speaks on experiences and observations about life and different emotions.

Which albums have had the biggest impact on your creativity and song writing?

Currently I’m actually trying as much as I can to not take too much reference from other projects. A dream of mine would be to one day be recognised as something completely in my own lane and I feel like this new approach of trying to just write and to not have a thousand influences in mind when writing will help me just project my own thought outward.

You toured with John Legend, what did you learn from that experience?

I think that tour gave me one of the biggest and most beneficial epiphanies. I remember standing on that stage and thinking: why don’t I feel like me? I don’t believe in what I’m singing and, other than it sounding cool, I have no connection or real experience with the words I'm singing. That has to be one of the scariest and humbling realisations I could have had at that moment, so as soon as I came off tour it completely changed the way I was writing and I after that I stopped trying to sound so much like what was popping up at the time, and tried to just figure myself out.

You can record a duet with one artist, who do you pick?

It would have to be Sting.

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