Interview

Tiggs Da Author

26-year-old musician Tiggs Da Author moved from Tanzania to South London as a child and as a teenager found a love for grime music. Mixing these influences with those from his native country he started to create his own blend of sounds and when working in a studio in the capital happened to meet hip-hop legend Sway who took an interest in his unique sound and invited him to sing on a track. His debut EP, Evilution, continued the mounting interest in him and lead to primetime radio play and more recently, a slot on famed music show "Later…With Jools Holland". And with a debut album on the way, things can only get better.

You got into music going to pirate radio shows as a teenager - quite different to people these days coming up through school media and YouTube - do you think people now assume that it is easier to break into music?

I think there’s definitely a bigger platform for artists to get their music out to people now. However I would say that it’s harder to break as an artist nowadays. With everyone having a platform to put their music out you have to really stand out from the crowd and make a lot of noise to be heard amongst everything else.

You got into music going to pirate radio shows as a teenager - quite different to people these days coming up through school media and YouTube - do you think people now assume that it is easier to break into music?

I think there’s definitely a bigger platform for artists to get their music out to people now. However I would say that it’s harder to break as an artist nowadays. With everyone having a platform to put their music out you have to really stand out from the crowd and make a lot of noise to be heard amongst everything else.

You got into music going to pirate radio shows as a teenager - quite different to people these days coming up through school media and YouTube - do you think people now assume that it is easier to break into music?

I think there’s definitely a bigger platform for artists to get their music out to people now. However I would say that it’s harder to break as an artist nowadays. With everyone having a platform to put their music out you have to really stand out from the crowd and make a lot of noise to be heard amongst everything else.

What do you class as your ‘big break’?

I'm not sure I have had a 'big break' yet but I think my biggest achievement or best platform I have had so far is performing at Glastonbury on BBC2 at their studio straight after Adele. Lots of people were watching and I received a lot of praise which meant so much performing there among so many great talents. The fact that people were even acknowledging me was amazing.

What do you class as your ‘big break’?

I'm not sure I have had a 'big break' yet but I think my biggest achievement or best platform I have had so far is performing at Glastonbury on BBC2 at their studio straight after Adele. Lots of people were watching and I received a lot of praise which meant so much performing there among so many great talents. The fact that people were even acknowledging me was amazing.

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